May 11 – 12
Toronto Sporting Life 10k
Jenny Emery – 41:23
Laurelly Dale – 39:27
Charissa deKoninck – 50:53
Kat Mylvaganam – 37:42
Esther Lee – 41:25

Ottawa Sporting Life 10k
Dylan Wykes – 30:13 – 1st OA
Sandra Sukstorf – 51:08

Jeff Taylor – Sudbury Rocks Half – 1:24:38
Mark Kerr – Howe Island Hustle 8k – 33:06

May 18 – 19
Craig Fowler – Sun Mountain 50k – 4:16 – 1st Overall!
Katie Bowyer – Sun Mountain 50k – 5:36 – 5th female Overall!
Annie Riel – SSQ Lonueuil Marathon – 3:40:45 – 14min PB + BQ!
Radim Picek – Salzburg Half – 1:13:54 – 6th OA
Mark Dawson – Hackey Half – 1:28:33!

M2M Elite x BCEP
Payton Jordan Invite – May 2
Rachel Cliff – 10,000m 31:54.88, PB!
Erica Digby – 5,000m 15:39.10 PB!

USATF High Perfomance Meet, LA – May 16
Luc Bruchet – 13:45.26
Rachel Cliff – 15:32.49
Erica Digby – 15:33:51 PB!

Theo Hunt – Portland Twilight 5,000m – 14:39.67

May 25 – 26
Ottawa Race Weekend
Ottawa Marathon
Gary Cheung – 2:46:10
Tyler Ashurst – 3:04:46 PB!
Anice Wong – 4:26:38
Caitlin Wood – 3:30:06 PB!
Kerri Andreas – 3:06:52

Ottawa Half Marathon
Victoria Asikis – 1:44:32
Lisa Hoffart – 1:33:00
Roy Pelletier – 2:18:07
Sandra Sukstorf – 1:55:49
Esther Lee – 1:38:15

Ottawa 5k
Sandra Sukstorf – 24:59

Ottawa 10k
Dylan Wykes – 29:56 – 6th OA, 1st Canadian Championship
Kevin Coffey – 30:52, 13th OA, 8th Canadian Championships

Other May 26 Results
Geoff Lyster – Calgary Marathon – 3:24:38 – BQ + fastest time in 16 years!!
Dave Cashin – Hamilton Season Open 5,000m – 14:50.90
Adam Buzinsky – Saskatchewan Marathon – 2:37:25 – 3rd Overall!
Kerri Coates – Run for Water Half – 2:11:32
Joe Berger – Vermont City Marathon – 4:21:09
Shannon Banal – Survival of the Fittest 18k – 2:08:51, 7th OA!
Ibin Paulo Ardila – Shaughnessy Oasis 8k – 34:37
Edward Benton-Evans – Iron Knee 25k – 2:53:34

The track is where most of the M2M coaches first fell in love with the sport, and it was vital to their development as athletes. Many folks who get into the sport later in life mainly use the track as a training venue and have never had the opportunity to throw down in a proper track race. We started Chase the Pace to give our crew the opportunity to have a full-on 5,000m race effort on the track.

What is Chase the Pace?

Chase The Pace (CTP) is not your standard track meet. Most track meets are rather stale and quite honestly, somewhat boring. We try to do things differently with CTP. We want people to have a good time out there, so we have music, food, beer, and other cool stuff to help promote a fun environment.

The main thing about CTP, however, is the actual running. We want people to run their guts out and hopefully set a PB in the process. We help facilitate this in a few ways. First off, the event has the previously mentioned kick-ass vibe. We put people in heats with other runners of similar ability, because running with a group is always easier than having at it solo.

Pacers are the secret sauce

Racing is hard, you have a lot to think about, we don’t need you worrying about splits or pacing – that’s why we have pacers. They will take care of all of that for you. We have sections for all levels, from sub 16:00 to 27:30, no matter your ability, we will have a pace for you.

The track is the place to test your fitness

To be the best runner you can be you have to cover all your bases. There are the easy aerobic runs, tempo runs, long runs and speed work to be crushed. We often choose track as our surface of choice for speed work. The surface is flat, the distance is accurate and it is the most controlled environment we can get which makes it the perfect place for all-out efforts. The track is the place to find out exactly how fit you are.

The 5,000m is a great distance to test yourself

5,000m is a tricky distance – if you go out too fast you suffer. If you’re struggling at 2km, that’s a problem, but if you’re struggling at 3km you can usually stick it out. It’s all about staying strong and being focused and gauging your effort well. That’s why we have our pacers there to help.

Approaching the track as a first timer

Pacing for a first timer is a bit of trial and error. You can’t just step on a track and know what effort you can sustain for a prolonged period of time. Err on the side of caution if it is your first time. Go slow and keep the effort manageable. Now let’s apply this to a track workout, for example, 10x400m. Start at a pace that you know you can sustain, for example, 2minutes per lap. If you handle this well then you know that next time you can go harder, but if you go out too hard and only get in a few efforts before slowing down you don’t really know where you are at. The more time you spend on the track the better you will get at judging efforts. This will translate not only to your ability to pace track workouts, but also your judge of pace in general for all types of training.

Using racing to inform training paces

An all-out 5,000m effort such as CTP can be a big help to help set paces for future track sessions as it will give you a clear picture as to where your fitness currently is.

Getting ready to race

Before each M2M track session, we do a 2-3km warm-up, followed by a series of drills and strides. Warming up pre-race should look very similar to this. No need to change from what you are used to. Keep it consistent and familiar.

Make sure to cool-down after the race! This is a full-on effort, you are going to accumulate a lot of lactate in the muscles, even a slow 2km jog afterward will help to flush some of that junk and allow for quicker recovery. Then go have a beer.

Using racing on the track as a training tool

Racing can be an awesome training tool because in a race you can dig deeper, push harder and suffer harder than you can during a workout. And as a result, you will get both physically stronger, and mentally tougher.

Even if you are training for a marathon, a 5,000m has its benefits. It will increase your speed, bump your V02max, increase pain tolerance and help your running economy.

It is also short enough that it can fit seamlessly into your training plan- the recovery is often much quicker than other race distances, so you can get right back to normal training after a couple easy days. It is basically a hard ass speed work day.

For many of you, your goal race for the spring season is done and dusted. Whether the distance was 1 mile, the marathon, or something in between and no matter if you met, exceeded or came up a bit short of your goal, now is most definitely the time for a bit of rest and recovery.

We all need to respect the need for downtime. It’s as important to listen to your body now as it is when you are in the thick of training. At M2M we usually recommend you take a full week off from running after a marathon. You put your body through a lot of trauma out on the roads and trails. If you find you can’t sit still during this time off from running it’s okay to do some other low-impact or non-impact training. A return to full training should happen gradually over the next 2-3 weeks. Even if your goal race was shorter than the marathon you should still take a few rest days and a few weeks away from structured training.

Take some time for your mind

Too often we see athletes neglecting this aspect of recovery. It’s important that we respect the mental fatigue from a big training block and goal race. 2018 Boston Marathon Champ, Des Linden, said it best after this year’s race.

There is just no way you can stay focused and ‘on it’ day in and day out 52 weeks of the year without experiencing some mental burnout. So even if your body is feeling recovered, take some time off for your mind.

Coping with the post-marathon blues

Many athletes find the transition time between seasons very difficult. I can remember that time well – the post-marathon blues were something I often experienced during my career. You’re out of routine, eating like crap, drinking more than usual and your future goals are a bit unclear. And that is ok.

The transition period is definitely the time to indulge, spend more time with friends and family (that may have been a bit neglected when you were crushing all those miles prepping for your goal race), and do some non-running activities on your bucket list.  It is also a good time to try something new in training or racing. Sign-up for that trail race you’ve always wanted to do or start that strength training routine you’ve neglected for so long. Mixing it up a little should help you to get rolling again later this spring.

So what’s next?

If you haven’t planned out your racing schedule for the fall, now is a good time to do that too. Sit down with your coach, talk about your goals and make a plan to achieve them. This has always been something that helped me kick start my training again after a little downtime. Getting those goal races set in stone can help you visualize what the training will be like over the next few months.

BMO Vancouver Marathon:
Rob Watson – 2:25:10 6th Overall (first in our hearts)
Doug Phillips – 3:10:46
Farid Muttalib – 2:52:08
Andrea Cain – 3:51:30, first marathon!
Fainne Martin – 3:23:48 PB & BQ!
Jay Zhu- 3:37:48, PB
Katie Gordon – 3:51, first marathon!
Colton Higgins – 3:22
Daniel Lord – 4:15, first marathon!
Genevieve Martin – 4:24
Felix Yu – 3:41:53, 17min PB
Rodrigo Caudra – 5:10:23
Richard Brittin – 3:03:09, PB
Jan Duzinkiewicz – 3:03:35, PB
Clare Wilkes – 3:51:56
Jill Emery – 3:42:11, PB
Tadashi Yamamura – 2:55:31
Shirley Wood – 3:44:19
Marc Spatley – 3:05:54, PB
Matt Diederichs – 3:19:45, PB
David Godsall – 3:22:27, PB
Ryan Hobson – 3:16:07, PB
Grace Sullivan – 4:38:37
Erin Ready – 3:26:53, 19min PB & BQ
Todd Nickel – 3:19:46, 6min PB!
Cillian Collins – 3:30:58

BMO Vancouver Half Marathon
Kara Naish – 1:50:21
Thais Mori – 1:54:10
Mark Soo – 1:53:13
Amanda Warboys – 1:48:54
Mark Dawson – 1:31:28
Chen Li – 1:38:50, 9min PB!
Adam Buzinsky – 1:15:22, PB
Lee Kennett – 1:19:41, PB
Laurel Richardson – 1:23:08, PB
Lissa Zimmer – 1:24:14
Bri Hungerford – 1:19:26. welcome to the sub 1:20 club! + 5th OA!
Matt Zielinski – 1:35:21, PB
Ian Kerr – 1:23:07, PB
Justin Yan – 1:35:47, PB
Dante Luciani – 1:22:59, PB
Sarah Morris – 2:00:30
Shu Sanatani – 1:34:54
Julie Hathaway – 1:30:34, PB
Lisa Stanley – 1:44:27
Rebecca Dziedzic – 1:57:41
David Gvozdanovich – 1:30:13, first half!
Hope Moir – 1:42:33, PB!
Cody Green – 1:30:16, PB!
Chris Atkinson – 1:45:13, PB!
James Lee – 1:55:11, first half!
Anice Wong – 1:54:16, PB!
Lawrence Buchan – 1:22:54, PB!
Craig Roy – 1:34:54
Jordan Whitlow – 1:47:40
Carla Shukaliak-Kramer – 1:40:21, PB!

BMO Vancouver – Marathon Relay
Ladies of M2M: Alex Denysiuk, Carla Parsons, Steph McGregor, Rebecca Hartshorn – 3:07:09!

Goodlife Toronto Marathon
Ben Gustafson – 2:33:51, 7+ min PB, 2nd place Overall
Michael Cosentino – 2:58:12, 10min PB!
Caitlin Wood – 3:32:58, PB

Goodlife Toronto Half-Marathon
Jenny Emery – 1:35:01
Tyler Ashurst – 1:27:35, PB!
Kat Mylvaganam – 1:23:39
Esther Lee – 1:32:22

Mississauga MarathonRotterdam Marathon, April 7:
Arthur Oskan – 3:15:29 7+ min PB & BQ

Marató del Garraf – Trail Marathon, Spain
Elly Woods – 5:25:55 – 4th place OA!

Payton Jordan Invitational – Palo Alto, CA
Erica Digby – 5,000m – 15:39.10, PB
Rachel Cliff – 10,000m – 31:54, PB